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commission on civil rights set up by president eisenhower in 1857. this is about half an hour. >> on your screen now is a well-known face for c-span viewers. that's mary frances berry, professor at the university of pennsylvania and also the author several books. with university of pennsylvania today to chat to her about this book, "and justice for all: the united states commission on civil rights and the continuing struggle for freedom in america" . mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began? >> guest: the civil rights missions started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with john foster dulles, secretary of state, but the way the united states is in or on the road because of the racism going on that people would hear about and read about. and the fact that there seem to be a lot of episodes that kept happening, whether it is one chain or some discrimination taking place in the country said the idea was that eisenhower said he was going to ask congress to save the civil rights commission, which would put the facts on top of the table. i'm told
in with no preparation at all at a time when president kennedy's entire legislative program, civil-rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled completely by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they have been controlling it for over a quarter of a century, to see him get that program up and running and passing it, ramming it through, to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination, is a lesson in what president can do if he not leno's all of the levers to pull but has the will in lyndon johnson's case, almost vicious drive to do it, to win, is to say over and over again and always saying to myself when i'm doing the research, with hall, look what he is doing here. i try, i don't say i succeeded by try to explain that in my books. it gives a true insight into how power works in washington. there is another reason i don't get tired of doing these books of lyndon johnson. because you are always learning something new. that goes even if what you are researching is something that has been written about a thousand or ten thousand tim
of the modern state of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans tender civil rights movement. stone wall is the stonewall is really the way this movement kicked off. host: richard, connecticut, independent line. caller: i do not understand why you don't have someone from the opposition to this gentleman on the show, because it is is somewhat controversial subject and you have one view. that is very obvious to anyone watching the show. a second point is that, internationally, people like this gentleman who have support in the united states -- in many countries against the nets is, if you got now, ukraine, russia, hungary, dozens and dozens of nations are looking at the united states as an evil mention because tunnel men like this person -- gentleman like this person, " have lots of money and have more money than average americans, are going into these nations and promoting the homosexual lifestyle. in russia, they had a riot and had to shut down our professed homosexual demonstration in -- shut down a pro-homosexual demonstration because, was funded b -- was funded by american groups. and
, the city of clinton was in the midst of a civil rights struggle. after what and restored a black neighborhood was firebombed, police officers and firefighters arrived to extinguish the flames but came under gunfire. an african-american teen was killed by police that night, a white man was shot and killed the next day. the national guard moved in. nine black men and one white woman were rounded up, hustled off to jail for their alleged involvement. the young defendants, the majority just high school age, were collectively sentenced to a total of more than 280 years in prison. rev. ben chavis served more than five years in prison. shortly after he appeared on "democracy now!" last month, governor perdue issued pardons of innocence for the wilmington 10. the move came after newly surfaced documents revealed the prosecutor in the case made racially biased notes next to potential jurors, writing comments like "kkk good." i asked rev. chavis last night what it felt like to be attending president of the inauguration on dr. martin luther king day, after finally being pardoned. >> this is
to a second term on a holiday celebrating one of its foremost civil rights leaders. >> while these truths may be self-evident, they have never been self-executing. >> reporter: it was as much an inauguration as a cross cultural celebration. a place where a puerto rican woman raised in a housing project swears in a catholic environment from scranton, pennsylvania, where a gay cuban immigrant reads his home about a rising sun shining equally on all of us. >> my face, your face. millions of faces in morning's mirrors. >> president obama tied it all together in his speech, linking his vision to the evolving history of civil rights in the u.s. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still, just as it guided our forbearers to seneca falls and selma and stonewall. just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsong, who left footprints along this great mall, to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone. >> reporter: he swore on the bibles of abraham lincoln and dr. martin luther king jr., connecticuting
, making mentions of past civil rights struggles on that martin luther king day, seneca falls, selma, stonewall and laying out his vision for the future, advancing gay rights, tolerance toward illegal immigrants, social welfare programs and stopping climate change. dan loathian was there watching it all with us. dan, friend and foe alike have been calling this a muscular speech. >> reporter: it really was according to those who got a chance to witness the speech. the president delivering his remarks in a much more different climate than he faced four years ago when you had two wars, there was the economic crisis. this time, the president laid out a progressive agenda for the next four years. and so it began, the second inaugural ceremony of president obama, part campaign speech, part lecture, a confident president obama appeared comfortable in his skin. >> my fellow americans, we're made for this moment and we'll seize it as long as we seize it together. we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal >> our journey is not complete unti
, gay rights, civil rights. there was a feeling in the way he framed on that platform it felt different to her. it felt different to me. that was your reaction as well? >> it felt different to me as well. we're all sitting around whether we're journalists or not. we're listening for things. from our own experiences. so when i heard the president of the united states say stonewall after saying seneca falls and selma, sort of an electric shock went through me. whoa, the president of the united states just woef in the gay rights movement with the women's rights movement and the traditional civil rights movement, but he didn't just leave it there. that would have been box checking, but in the next paragraph he talked about our gay brothers and sisters and equal treatment under the law, and that went well beyond what i think anyone even expected a president of the united states to say in an inaugural address one of their premier platforms for the american president to not only talk to the american people, but to tack to the world. while this was a domestic address, a completely agree with th
for everybody. he also talked about the civil rights movement. i think the idea behind this of s of basic equality and opportunity. our country is founded on those principles. when he talked about immigration today, again, it was opportunity and equality and he's going to fight for that just as he had his entire career he's going to do that for the next four years. his hope-- as we had the national day of service yesterday sds that ordinary americans get involved. get engaged with their country whether through volunteerism, whether through letting their voices be heard as we try to pursue legislation in washington it's a spirit of for engagement and that was a big part of what the president was saying today. we don't have to solve all of our problems but let's not put the short-term political interests ahead of the american people. >> schieffer: ms. jarrett, it's bob schieffer here. i wanted to ask you, because you do know the president so well. republicans i keep hearing say, well, they think the president doesn't like them. they say he doesn't like politics. that he doesn't like to get
in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on the supreme court. she will be delivering the oath of office to the vice president. this is beyonce coming in now and we will be hearing from her. there are several musical performances today. after the vice president is sworn in, james taylor will be singing "america the beautiful." then following that, john roberts, jr., the chief justice of the united states will administer the oath of office to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the eld
several pivotal civil rights moments, he linked them together. dan yoth lothian has the highlights. >> reporter: this is a speech we're told the president had been working on since mid december, and he delivered it rather in a much different climate than he had four years ago, and he was dealing with two wars and also a financial crisis this time, the president used history to help define a progressive agenda for the next four years. >> please raise your right hand. >> reporter: and so it began. the second inaugural ceremony of president barack obama. part campaign speech, part pragmatic lecture, a confident mr. obama appeared comfortable in his presidential skin. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment and he will shall seize it together. >> reporter: the speech was rooted in history and fittingly on this holiday, reverend martin luther king jr.'s dream. >> we hold these truths to be self-evident. that all men are created equal. >> the past made modern with first-time references to climate change, immigration reform and sexual equality. >> our journey is not complete u
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
obama, "the bridge," talks about how he grew out of the civil rights movement, led by martin luther king. you write in the book, david, that race has been at the core of president obama's story. but it's not been in the foreground of his presidency. >> that's true. he's gotten some criticism for that from some bloack leaders. he views his presence in the white house is essential. and everything he can do, whether it's improving the economy or keeping the united states safe, improves the lives of all americans. he's very wary of being the president of black america. he's insistent on being the president of the united states. and sometimes, that's caused him difficulty with certain black leaders. cornell west is one. there's others. >> and you said the president blames his americanism. what did you mean by that? >> president obama is very clear, he has the opportunity to represent all of america. he realizes that that history helps him lead the entire country. and so, he's claimed his america is not simply as black america. >> i was just going to say. this is also the 150th anniversary her
survive half slave and half free. >> casting himself in the mold of the great civil rights leader, vowed action on a series of issues from climate change to immigration reform and became the first president to use the word "gay" in the address. >> our gurn noi are not complete until wives, daughters, can earn a wage equal to their efforts. our journey is not complete until our gay brother and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. >> he offered a bigger defense of entitlement programs. >> we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit, but we reject the belief america has to choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. >> like every president since fdr, mr. obama started it with a prayer service at st. johns church before departing the white house for one of the longest motorcades known to man for the ride to the capitol. ♪ oh beautiful >> a star-studded affair where else will paul ryan mingle with beyonce who belted out the national anthem. when the
to the inauguration last week and the pet's ema bracing civil rights for gays and lesbians the boy scouts are far behind where america is today. >> jennifer: you raised this you never thought you would hear a president use the word "gay," and talking about stonewall and the president being in favor of gay marriage, and eliminating don't ask don't tell. how much do you think of a difference a president makes in a decision like this for the boy scouts? do you think he gave them coffer or maybe pushed them a little bit to be able to open up the boy scouts to gay leaders and scouts. >> i don't think that singular act was what tipped the scales. i think i has been a steady progress over the last 23 years, that americans are understanding you can't vilify and demonize their sisters and brothers and children anymore. and it isn't all that radical anymore. the majority of americans also agree with the president in marriage equality for people. the boy scouts were behind the times. it's wonderful to have a leader like president obama, but this really was a grass roots movement that
. it is the right thing to do. in my view, this is a human rights issue of our times. like the civil rights issues of the 1960's. like the women's rights issues before it. it is of a fair and right thing to do is to pass comprehensive immigration reform, that provides a pathway to citizenship for individuals who are here, while also helping young people who were brought here at no fault of their own to be able to complete high school, going to college, serve in the military, and know that they can live and our country without fear of deportation. known as the dream act. and so, those are things that are very important to me. i know you said you are from texas. it is a very important issue. i will be serving on the homeland security committee and that committee has partial jurisdiction over immigration issues, particularly those pertaining to border security, ice, and customs, so we look forward to tackling that an upcoming session. host: representing nevada's fourth district as a democrat. tell us about the district it encompasses. guest: the nevada fourth district is the newest seat that we learn
democratic state senator henry marsh a lifelong civil rights advocate left town to attend president obama's inauguration yesterday, the g.o.p. took advantage using their one-day majority of 20-19 to pass new redistricting lines that would create more republican-dominated districts. but in an apparent peace offering, virginia republicans did honor martin luther king as they adjourned. i'm kidding. they actually honored confederate general stonewall jackson on dr. king's holiday. tasteful. joining me now from d.c. is political reporter joe williams. and here with me in new york is the only and only sam seder host of the majority report. thank you for your time tonight to discuss all of this malfeasance. joe, let me start with you because my head hurts over this. help me out here. 41 votes to maintain a filibuster instead of 60 to break it. is that the kind of reform harry reid has been promising month after month? >> basically it is change we can believe in if you're a senator because what they want is a rule that can benefit them when they're in the minority. and that is kind of a half mea
was a veteran of the civil rights fight. double crassness to do it on the fact he's out of town attending the inraugation of the first black president. lee jackson king day, i was there. doesn't surprise me at all. what happens is you don't have a state where the consequences have to be paid for these kind of actions. you don't have a significant voting block. virginia has flipped from blue to red on the local level. not a whole lot of pushback from the democrats on the voter side until they get punished for these kind of actions it will continue. >> john: joe williams and host of ring of fire and the majority report sam seder. love talking to both of you. thank you forget for coming on. >> yet another mass shooting this time in the gun friendly state of texas. my congratulations to wayne lapierrre and the nra coming up. >> john: there was another shooting at another school today. this time in texas. at lone star college. the shooter wounded three people one critically, despite being surrounded by good guys with guns. thankfully, no one was killed. this shooting like all of the others tha
it was understood as an incredible affirmation of the humanity and civil rights of african americans. >> desegregating the public schools. >> desegregating the public schools, rejecting separate and unequal. but the truth was, it really didn't desegregate the schools even until today. roe v. wade, which was won, the whole idea of women's equality under the constitution was in its infancy. there had been almost no decisions in 1973 recognizing discrimination against women as prohibited by the constitution. roe v. wade comes down, and it's not understood as an affirmation of women's personhood, that we don't lose our human rights when we become pregnant. but almost overnight the public health situation dramatically improved, not only because women had access to legal abortion, but they didn't have to carry to term pregnancies when they weren't healthy. and so it was a dramatic change in the practicality. but what we're still very much fighting is an understanding and a respect for the fact that women, whatever their decisions are during pregnancy, remain full persons under the law. >>
, avery friedman, civil rights attorney and law professor in cleveland and richard herman, new york criminal defense attorney and law professor joins us from miami this week. let's start with the class action lawsuits being filed against the subway restaurant chain. this is an ireport photo of one of the many that turned up around the world and the internet showing subway sandwiches that don't measure up to the company's foot-long claim. subway won't comment on pending legal action but did release this statement -- "for 47 years customer satisfaction has been our top priority. we regret any instance where we did not full fully deliver on our promise to customers." richard, how big a deal is this? >> miguel, does size really matter? does it really matter? does that half an inch or an inch really matter? >> it matters to somebody. attorneys out there. >> to somebody, that's right. >> it seems to matter. that foot-long, all those commercials with the song, well, they're not a foot long. they're 11 inches long or 11 1/2 inches long. it's not like mcdonald's who says, look, i got a quart
. >> absolutely. the civil rights movement created the possibility for barack obama to become president and i think he's ever mindful of that. i think that's where that community organizing comes in him. he knows that communities create the power. you think about the gay rights movement, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, this is all part of who he is and i think it's part of american history. when i look at american history, those movements are critical in transforming our attitudes about ourselves and about one another. and that's where real change takes place. lincoln said, you control public sentiment, controls everything. even if they can't control my voice. >> sometimes when historians try to speak too much in the course of one inaugural weekend, this is what happens. we're going to allow doris rest her voice for a second. you saw when we were talking a motorcade and you'd be forgiven for thinking there's the president on the move from the white house. it was not. first of all, you can't swing a dead cat without hit ago motorcade this weekend in washington. that was just t
's rights and civil rights. >> our journey isn't complete until our gay brothers andor t sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. (applause) righ for if we are truly created equal than surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> reporter: the president elevated man-made climate change higher than at any time since winning reelection, resurrecting an issue he's barely touched forly tou more than two years.n two ye >> some may still deny theill deny overwhelming judgment of science bu but none can avoid theg impact devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms.ith 11 mil >> reporter: with 11 million illegal immigrants in america,ngress to mr. obama called on congress topr provide a legal path tohip. citizenship. >> our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity. until bright young students and engineers are listed in our work force rather than expelled fromm our country. >> reporter: mr. obama also recalled the newtown shootin
rights. take for example the civil war when men fled behind so-called enemy lines to the north, they inserted their humanity with the demand they be allowed to join the union army and fight against the confederacy. and black soldiers in world war i came home to find themselves the targets of lynchings and beatings. why? because they were wearing their uniforms in public. but it was the very fact of their service that w.e.b. du bois believed bound them to the citizenship. but with those citizens at home, w.e.b. du bois wrote, this is the country to which we soldiers of democracy return and this is the fatherland for which we fought, but it is our fatherland. it was right for us to fight. the faults of our country are our faults. make way for democracy, and we saved it in france, and by the great jehovah, we will save nit the united states of america or know the reason why. but it wasn't until world war ii that du bois's imperative would become fully realized, because afric african-american like the tuskegee airmen and the first african-american nurses who j n joined the black n
stonewall, along with selma, put it with the civil rights movement and a gay bar raided by police. this says a lot about where his values are right now on this issue. and it speaks volumes about where the country's moved. >> he also mentioned women's equality as well, women's rights. what is wrong with an america, a modern america taking a basic standpoint that all men and women should be equal, whether it's the amount they're paid for the same job, their sexuality, the color of their skin. i like the way the president brought it all together and said, you know something? actually, equality should mean that -- equality. >> he did sort of say that, but the one word he never said yesterday, piers, was gun or guns and we ought to put that on the record. there's a great reason he didn't say that, i guess the same reason he never bothered to revive the assault weapons ban -- >> i'm talking about guns all night, as you know. >> talking about president obama in his second term. let's be fair about his first term. >> do you have any exception to him wanting to apparently categorize as joe biden who
thurman whom hated the civil rights bill so much, mr. dixiecrt that he stood tup on the floor of the senate for 24 hours and 18 minutes before he had to pee and filibuster ended and they voted. but that was the filibuster. now, it's come into something that happens all the time, that is routine that one senate can do to block a measure from coming up a vote. first, they have a vote of whether or not they are going to proceed to a vote. you can filibuster that. you can filibuster the main event, and you don't have to do a filibuster. all you have to say is: i am filibustering this and sit in your office and watch t.v. and nothing happens. it is outrageous. it is undemocratic. it's the tierney of the minority. we talked about this for so long with senators who were determined that not just this term, but last term term before, but this term for sure with democrats having 55 votes, there is no reason why they couldn't fix it. and if i canning it meant either getting rid of the filibuster or making people actually filibuster or roll in cots so the
next guest, henry marsh at the forefront of the civil rights battle. he handled more than 50 school desegregation cases and innovated strategies to battle employment discrimination, which is what makes the action of his conservative colleagues in the general assembly worthy of condemnation. when mr. marsh went to washington, d.c. last week on martin luther king day to witness president obama's second inauguration, republicans in the state senate used his absence to gerrymander the commonwealth map. joining me from richmond is virginia state senator, henry marsh. nice to have you mr. marsh. >> good morning. >> first i want to say thank you for joining us. i understand how had to go to the early services at church this morning to make time to be here. i greatly appreciate that. >> i didn't want to miss church. the lord made all this happen. >> in fact, let me ask you in part about how angry you are about how your absence has made possible this new map. >> actually, i'm ashamed and embarrassed for my state. somebody's absent almost two or three days a week. never was there an attempt t
this coalition of civil rights and faith groups, labor leaders and immigration advocates are calling for action on immigration reform in 2013. they say the time is right. >> with the passage of the dream act, with the passage of marriage of equality, the voters in this country want us to treat every who is here humanely. >> reporter: opponents vowed to fight it. >> to make all these people instantly citizen will put a tremendous strain on our social services system across the country. we just cannot afford it for people who don't deserve it. >> reporter: the call for action on immigration reform will focus on a massive demonstration here at the us capitol planned for april 10th. they say they are fighting for the future of the country we all share. at the u.s. capitol, chris gordon, news4. >>> tonight the boy scouts of america is reconsidering its ban on gale members and leaders. the board meets next week to vote on that issue. nbc news has learned if the change is approved, individual scout groups would be able to decide for themselves whether gale people with join. >> the fate of ex-culpepper
. >>> the controversial plan to limit the size of sugary drinks has hit an unexpected new roadblock. two mayor civil right groups have gone to stop it. jeff glor, good morning. >> good morning to you. not many were surprised to see them oppose it but some were surprised when the spanish deck calculation and the naacp. they said they're doing it not because of race but because of economic fairness. new york city mayor michael bloomberg's plan would but a limit to 16-understand drink in restaurants, sports games, street carts, and movie theaters. it results in $4.7 billion in annual health care costs. 60% of which is paid by the city. >> our administration refuses to stand on the sidelines while millions of our fellow new yorkers struggle with the health implications of being overweight or obese. >> reporter: but the naacp says the mayor's approach is not right. >> the mayor sometime decided that an issue that is important to him should be just a this way or no hazel dukes is the presid. >> the decision is -- >> people can say what they want to. we are on the side of fairness. >> the lawsuit contents the su
of the civil rights act and the voting changes that occurred then. but since then, we've heard no mention of the right to vote in this country being a protected right and the sanctity of that idea. i think the only thing -- first of all, we gotta remember, we vote every two years in this country. not every four. that needs to be the refrain from -- every time you talk about an election, anybody within the sound of my voice needs to -- when they talk about voting or any of those things or what's going to happen in the next election, you're not talking about 2016. you're talking about 2014. those often matter more so because that's when they sneak these folks through. that's when purple districts turn red because people are look the other way or are too busy. thanks for the call. appreciate it. we'll be back right after this. more of "the stephanie miller show". celebrating her mom's 90th birthday. >> she'll be back tomorrow though. >> she will. >> i'm sorry. that's inappropriate. >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." desmond tutu said a quote that is one of my favorite quotes. "w
to the bloomberg bomb's soda ban. some civil rights group think it will hurt minority business owners. could it be the straw that break the nanny state back? or the straw that breaks the soda? back in moments. we'll tell you. so you say men are superior drivers? yeah. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? [ voice of dennis ] silence. we replaced people with a machine.r, what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. ♪ many hot dogs are within you. try pepto-bismol to-go, it's the power of pepto, but it fits in your pocket. now tell the world daniel... of pepto-bismol to-go. >>> i'm bret baier this washington. the big story here, confirmation hearing for the president's pick as the new secretary of state with foreign policy hot spots around the world. only getting hotter. tonight on "special report,"
. >> andrea: coming up, now a racial component to the bloomberg bomb's soda ban. some civil rights group think it will hurt minority business owners. could it be the straw that break the nanny state back? or the straw that breaks the soda? back in moments. we'll tell you. colleagues with "the five." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> greg: disgusting. >> dana: you're disgusting. >> greg: that is a sick song. >> dana: can i do my segment? we're going to talk about you. soda ban about to go in effect in new york city but has new opposition that used to be for it. they were for it before they were against it. we'll tell you about that in a second. start with this. a new study done by daniel callahan, a senior research fellow at the hastings center. he put out a paper this week. see how skinny he is. he thinks it's maybe time to start shaming people who are overweight, obese, fat. that is the only way to get people to take care of themselves and prevent diss caused by obesity. now greg, do you have any experience you want to share? >> greg: all bioethicists are jerks. they usually talk about euthanasia. this guy
, they remember the fight and struggle led by martin luther king and other people during the civil rights era to break through america's history of racism, of segregation, of people being marginalized. king lead to a lot of what we know now as historic legislation, the civil rights act, the voting rights act, the fair housing act. so there is a legacy that king left the benefit it and created the conditions under which president obama could even be elected to you do not have the voting rights act, you do not have black elected officials did you do not have the black vote -- a voting turnout that ultimately becomes critical in the 1990's, 2000, and of course in 2008, even in 2012. there is a long legacy. president obama himself acknowledges that he stands on those shoulders. not just the shoulders of former presidents that he talks about, but also the civil rights leaders. so it is significant that this is being held on martin luther king's holiday. and, of course, he is the president that is there when the martin luther king memorial actually comes about and is put up here in washington, d.c.
is not through. apologies. >> civil rights leader, merl the e evers who committedded her life to extend our nation's founding principles. mrs. evers will lead us in the invocation. shepard: she is the naacp's mississippi field secretary in 1963 when he was gunned down in the driveway of his jackson, mississippi home, and she carries forward his legacy. merle evers williams. >> america, we are higher here. our nation's capitol. on this day, january the 21st, 2013, the inauguration of our 45th president, barack obama. we come at this time to ask blessings upon our leaders. the president, vice president, members of congress, all elected and appointed officials of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon our armed forces. blessings upon all who contribute to the essence of the american spirit, the american dream. the opportunity to become whatever our mankind, womankind allows us to be. this is the promise of america. as we sing the words of belief, this is my country, let us act upon the meaning that everyone is included. may the inherent dignity and inalienable rights o
couldn't happen. civil rights, womens rights, don't ask don't tell, sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. change will happen when we work for it as a country. >> this will not work or make a difference. >> what will make a difference? >> prosecute guys that commit crimes. >> a minister asked the crowd to pray in the direction of the white house to wish the obama administration success in passing tighter gun control laws. >> tens of thousands of protestors took to the streets of san francisco for the anniversary of legalizing abortion. pro-life protestors marched down market street from the civic center to justin herman plaza demanding roe v wade be turned over. a law student who testified before congress about contraception was a guest speaker. >> there is a more profound sight about access. about affordability and insurance coverage and making sure people especially in rural areas have access. >> i would like to see everyone question abortion more. they say it should be legal and safe they don't talk about rare. >> as many as 40,000 people attended the pro-life rally. it's the biggest a
to a women's right to vote, of course. selma, alabama, the city where civil rights demonstrators fought for voting rights for african-americans in the march of 1965 only to be met violently by armed state troopers in a day that has since been known as bloody sunday. and the stonewall inn, often thought of the birthplace of the lgbt rights after a gay bar was raided by police in 1969 and for days became the site of protests and riots. here is the president yesterday. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still just as it guided our forbearers through seneca falls and selma and stonewall, just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone. to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on earth. >> the iconic nature of that speech, we americans love brands. we love iconic moments, whether it's the golden gate bridge or niagara falls or these things
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